The BBC documentary series “Employable Me” features a bunch of job seekers with neurological/developmental disorders such as autism / Asperger syndrome, Tourette syndrome and Down Syndrome, as they strive to overcome unemployment. The series aims to show the people behind the first impressions, and dispel the myth that people with neurological conditions are unemployable.

 

Photo from Employable Me: Ashley (Aspergers) handshakes potential employer in work trial in Auction hall
Ashley on work trial in auction hall
Credit: BBC

 
A total of 10 job seekers features in the 7 episodes*:

• Paul (52) has Tourette’s, and Brett (34) is autistic
• Tom (27) has Tourette’s, and Ashley (29) has Asperger syndrome
• Ellie (23) has Tourette’s, and Ben (27) has Asperger syndrome
• Thomas (25) has autism
• Louisa (40) has Asperger syndrome
• Zena (25) has Down Syndrome
• Matthew (27) has Down syndrome

The participants are all unique and different from each other, yet the conditions divide them into broad categories of shared challenges. Read More →

My face to face interviewer job ended last year. Rounding off the saga, I’d like to summarise what it was about, and speculate about why, overall, it worked well.

I was quite good at the job, and feel I’ve learned a lot, even though the work was quite repetitive. My boss was happy about my work and communication, and I had plenty of positive feedback from respondents both directly and through the quality control procedures. My response rates were also pretty good – not remarkable compared to the average, but good factoring in that my home range was supposedly hard to get decent results in. I was praised for the quality of my submitted work – data forms and weekly reports – for high accuracy, good order, and entertaining weekly reports.

 
Australian road from front window of car

 
The job ended because my employer had lost their tender for the project, so they had to close the whole project department down and sack everyone involved in the project… That’s all the interviewers, the office staff, and even my lovely boss.

If was a much bigger collapse for some of the other people, than it was for me. The staff turnover was notoriously low among both the office staff and the interviewer crew, and some had been working on the project for  well over a decade – almost since the beginning.

The organisation is the best employer I’ve had, and they handled the close-down well too. There was a proper explanation of what had happened (as much as they knew), scenario-thinking and instructions for what was and wasn’t allowed if moving to the competitor, and there was the usual supportive attitude underpinning the process. My boss also gave everybody her personal email and phone number, so future employers could still contact her for recommendations when she would no longer be working there.
Read More →

Post Navigation